A trait that is highly praised in today’s society is that of “results-driven” – a personal attribute that is proudly included in CVs, sought after by employers and promoted by most educational institutions.

However, the race to the finish line which holds the jackpot result, can create blinkers not only on our peripheral vision but also on our other senses, depriving us of the enrichment derived from subtle energies radiated by people as well as nature.

Recently I came across a couple of examples of this blinkered drive when I sent a video link to two people on a subject that I knew they were interested in. It was about 15 minutes long and covered many salient points. In their responses, both despaired that they could not afford the luxury of watching the whole thing and requested that I give them the gist in one sentence.

Now I had not only found the information in the talk interesting, but I found the energy of the speaker so positive, warm and uplifting. I genuinely had a ‘good feeling’ afterwards.

In his book, Subtle Energy: Awakening to the Unseen Forces in Our Lives, William Collinge Ph.D underlines the realisation that we are beings of energy, moved by the energy of others, our environment and the cosmos.

Most of us are aware of the peace and revitalising charge we receive from the sea and the countryside, but such reservoirs can also be found in everyday life, if we do not appoint Time along with a results-oriented life campaign as our sole master.

When you allow sensory expansion you stand to gain much from those who send out those ‘good vibrations’. Many years ago I had to interview someone whose work took him into the bush frequently and who appeared so attuned to the rhythm of nature. I don’t think I was consciously aware of the osmotic flow of energy between people then, as in flowing according to the ‘higher to lower potential’ principle, but I certainly sensed his freedom from negativity, his openness, optimism and harmonious warmth. After the interview, when I drove back to the office, I felt like I too was cocooned in a bubble of natural bliss.

Next time you deny yourself the opportunity of enjoying the moment (even if it is 15 minutes long!), adding the habitual bleat of “I don’t have time for this”, ask yourself if it is really true. What’s the worst that could happen if you took time out to enjoy the gift of the present? As you realise and appreciate the strength you can gain from tapping into many of the everyday outlets of positive influence, you too will turn into a reservoir for others.

Take the time to enjoy the journey, whether it’s towards a work deadline, a holiday destination or life itself.

Progress has little to do with speed, but much to do with direction.” ~ Unknown

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